Category Archives: Travel

Hawaiian Sea Turtles Up Close and Personal

On our last day in Hawaii we negotiated a late checkout (noon) but still had many hours to kill until our red-eye left just before midnight.  One of the things that we had not yet done was see some Sea Turtles so, after a little research, we visited the Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park which is about 2 miles (3 kilometres) south of the Kona International Airport.  We went into the main area just off of the Queen Kaahumanu Highway but when we said that we were looking for turtles they sent us out to the main highway to enter at the South edge of the park along a road called the Kealakehe Parkway.  Eventually you turn right off of this road in the direction of the Honokohau Beach.

When we got there it only took a few seconds to find some Green Sea Turtles as they were within feet of the shoreline foraging.  It didn’t hurt that there was another person wading only inches from one of the turtles taking pictures.  The turtles did not seem to mind our presence which made taking their picture quite easy.  The hardest part was being ready when they raised their head out of the water for a few seconds every few minutes.

The following three pictures show some different views of the turtles.  The first shows an entire turtle (they are about 3 feet long) at the water’s surface looking for food on the bottom.  The second shows a turtle with head up.  The camera was zoomed in so that only the front half is visible.  Finally, the third turtle was photographed with its head up as well but this time the camera was zoomed in such that the head almost fills the image.

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P1130259 - Green Sea Turtle Taking a Breath

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Note that the bottom 2 images were cropped to have an aspect ratio of 1.6 which is common to many computer displays. As a result, both of them make for a pretty cool desktop background or wallpaper!

Enjoy!

Watching a Family of Palila on the Big Island

[Updated December 10 2014 based on feedback.  Additional links on the Palila have been added.]

A recent week-long vacation took us to the Hawaiian Islands (October 26 to November 1). Having previously been to the island of Kauai at the old end of the island chain, we decided to try the island of Hawaii at the other, newer end.  To prevent confusion with the state of Hawaii this is frequently referred to simply as the Big Island.  I had my Panasonic FZ-200 camera along to document the trip.

On the last full day, I signed up for a Rainforest and Dryforest Birding Adventure tour — a day-long outing put on by a tour group called Hawaii Forest and Trail.  They do many other tours too that are not just for birding.  The rest of our group, for instance, went on the Mauna Kea Summit and Stars Adventure trip which takes you up to the volcano’s summit to watch a sunset.

Our trip set out in search of 2 specific target birds.  In the dry forests on the side of Mauna Kea we would be looking for the Palila, a critically endangered species which lives in a single forested area on the volcano’s slopes.  This forested area is the source of the māmane plant which the Palila has adapted to be able to eat and which is toxic to other birds.

In the second part of our excursion, we would travel to some wetter forests where we hoped to find different endemic, the ʻAkiapōlāʻau.

While we were, unfortunately, unable to track down the ʻAkiapōlāʻau, we were extremely successful with the Palila and the rest of this article describes that encounter.

Mauna Kea and the Palila

First, a quick note and the Palila habitat on the slopes of Mauna Kea.

Mauna Kea is still considered to be an active, though dormant, volcano and even though it has not erupted in 4600 years there is still the slim possibility that a lava flow from a future eruption could wipe out this habitat leading to their extinction.  While this might make for a good story in Hollywood, the reality is that there are much more dangerous risks that could well see the Palila gone from these slopes long before they are touched by lava.  Forest fires, for instance could, in the right conditions, very quickly destroy the Palila habitat.  Other threats include introduced species of plants, animals, insects and disease.  The Hawaiian government’s Mauna Kea Forest Restoration Project has lots of good information here.  Finally, according to BirdLife International, the endangered status of the Palila in recent years is also related to rapid population declines as a result of drought that has affected its primary source of food, the māmane plant.

The Palila Plan

The plan was simple.  We parked in an area accessed by a hunter access road on the lower slopes of Mauna Kea.  The trip organizers allowed for up to 4 hours climbing the slopes to find and view the Palila after which time, win or lose, we would head for the second location.

Here is a picture taken near our parking spot and at the lower edge of the area expected to contain the Palila.  Note the sparse trees on fairly open grassland.Mauna Kea slope forest home of the Palila

Here is a second shot taken as we climbed a little further up the Mauna Kea slope.Mauna Kea slope Forest Home to the Palila

Found:  A Family of Palila

According to the guide, on one recent trip they spent most of the allocated time hunting for the Palila and only found them as they were about to quit and move on.  We got lucky and found one after about 15 minutes with another pair showing up shortly thereafter.  In fact it appears that we had found a family unit with male, female and juvenile foraging together.  The juvenile showed typical begging behaviour with fluttering wings and an adult was doing the foraging and feeding of the juvenile though regurgitation as described, for instance, in a Palila wikipedia article.  This article says that both adults will regurgitate to feed the young in our case the male was feeding while the female stood guard, presumably looking for predators.  If the wikipedia article is correct then perhaps they take turns feeding and guarding or perhaps the guarding behaviour only happens occasionally, for instance when a large number of two-legged, orange-vested homo sapiens are also foraging in the area.

If we only consider predators seen historically before the arrival of man on the islands the most likely candidates would probably have been the Hawaiian Short-eared Owl (Pueo) and the Hawaiian Hawk (ʻIo).  It is not clear what threat we birders posed to the Palila though it was clearly not enough to drive them away.  Whether or not the female would have stood guard where and when she did if we had not be there is unclear.

As mentioned earlier, introduced predators are currently one of the Palila’s biggest threats.  These include feral cats and black rats (see for instance this article on the Palila from BirdLife International (birdlife.org).  Mosquitos transmitting avian malaria have also proved very dangerous to the endemic populations of birds.  They are also threatened by habitat degradation especially if it affects the growth and spreading of their primary food sources, the peas from the seed pods of the māmane plant and certain types of caterpillar.  Introduced mammals such as sheep and pigs are particularly bad for disturbing the forest plants.  Through hunting and fencing the threat of these has been reduced.

First Sighting: An adult male processing a māmane pod.

Our first sighting of a Palila was that of an adult male who was processing a māmane pod in the middle of a bush that provided the bird with some protection.  The following 7 pictures, shown in the order that they were taken, cover a period of about 9 seconds.  All of these pictures were cropped from the original size of 4000 x 3000 down to about 1200 x 800.  The displayed images below are shown at a resolution of 640 x 400 though the full-sized cropped images can be viewed clicking on the image and following the link back to Flickr.

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Video of the Male Foraging

The following is a short video that was taken starting 10 seconds after the last picture (above) was taken.  You can hear the group leader describing the bird to some of the birders that were just then discovering it for the first time.  Initially you can see the Palila alternating between working on the māmane pod and raising it’s head up to check its surroundings.

You can also hear the Palila in between the periods where it is working on the māmane pod and also after it appears to be done having released the māmane pod.  Perhaps these calls were communications to the other family members that would be showing up in the seconds that followed the video.  There may even have been a specific message to the juvenile that he (the adult male) was full and that it was time to eat.  This might also explain why he dropped the pod.  It’s not clear why they moved to a different location for the feeding.  Perhaps it was because of our presence or perhaps because it is generally safer to keep moving.

Unfortunately there is a half minute gap between this series of pictures and the next series with adult feeding juvenile.  The only thing that I recall from this period is that the juvenile and adult female arrived to join the adult male and then the female left again.

Second Sighting:  A juvenile begging and being fed by the adult male.

The second set of 7 images were taken over a period of 13 seconds starting 63 seconds after the last picture in the first set or about 38 seconds after the end of the short video.  As mentioned, in these 38 missing seconds the male moved to a different perch and a juvenile and an adult female flew in to join the adult male.  Only the juvenile stayed to be fed by the adult male while the female flew off to, it appears, stand guard (see the third sighting section below).

The sequence between the adult male and the juvenile clearly shows the begging behaviour as well as the regurgitation and transfer of food from adult to juvenile.

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The final image was taken 5 seconds after the previous one and shows the juvenile left alone and somewhat hidden in the foliage while the adult male had moved on, perhaps to start a new cycle of processing māmane pods prior to the next feeding cycle at which point he would call the juvenile to join him there.

Third Sighting: An adult female on guard duty.

The third set of 5 pictures were taken over a period of 24 seconds starting 18 seconds after the last image in the second set.

The adult female Palila, which made a brief appearance off camera took up a position 100 feet or so from where the other two birds were positioned.  Her perch at the top of a bare branch gave her good visibility. She chose a bush that kept all of the birders, which had broken into several groups by this time, on one side of her, perhaps in order to be able to see all of them at once without continually having to look in opposite directions.  As the photos show, she still does look away from time to time, perhaps scanning for other possible threats.  As mentioned previously, the two historic threats where probably the Hawaiian Short-eared Owl (Pueo) and the Hawaiian Hawk (‘Io).  At this point in our trip we had already seen 5 of these owls hunting (one near where we found the Palila) and we had one unconfirmed hawk sighting.

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I was impressed by the fact that both adult Palilas were caring for what was clearly a juvenile bird.  The splitting of the task of feeing the young was split into roles of foraging and standing guard.  It would have been nice to know if they switched roles from time to time.  Many species, particularly migratory ones, leave their young to fend for themselves at a much younger age or only one of the adults take responsibility for the young.

 Final Thoughts

I acquired my Panasonic FZ-200 camera to help with bird identification but on several occasions it has proven useful in seeing behaviours that I would never have noticed using just binoculars.  The ability to capture large numbers of pictures and even videos with sound provides the opportunity to analyze different aspects of bird sightings that happen too quickly in the field.

It would seem that my camera is rapidly replacing my binoculars as my primary birding equipment.  Here are some things that I might change in the future that might lead to better results:

  • Take more pictures and make more use of burst mode.  You can always delete them later.
  • Take more video clips.  Images can be extracted from these videos though not with the same resolution.  Video also records sound which can be useful in understanding bird behaviour.
  • Bring a tripod.  A remote control cable might be useful as well for the still shots.
  • Make sure that the memory card is fast and has lots of space.  Bringing extra fast cards will encourage taking lots of pictures and videos.
  • Add a directional microphone that plugs into the audio in jack on the camera.
  • Get more people involved.  It would be interesting to see if better behaviour could be captured with a coordinated group of birders taking pictures and videos together.  The camera clocks would obviously need to be either calibrated or synchronized to help determine the order of various events.

It was a fun way to get introduced to a new bird and, while it took a lot of time post-processing, it was definitely more satisfying than a brief sighting and a simple pencil mark on a checklist.

For More on the Palila Check Out the Following Links

The Palila article on Wikipedia.

The Palila Status at BirdLife International (birdlife.org).

The Mauna Kea Forest Restoration Project website from the Hawaiian state government has much more detailed and accurate information on current status and threats to the Palila.

The Facebook page for “A Paradise Lost”, an animated movie about the Palila directed by Laurie Sumiye.

A Visit to Central Zürich

A business trip to Zürich in early June was extended by a few days before and after to accommodate a little sight-seeing. The before-business visit consisted of 2 days in Zürich. During the first of these we walked from our hotel (Hotel Krone) downtown wandering around looking at both architecture and birds.

Here is a visual summary of some of the more interesting things that we saw:

Near the Hotel Krone in Zürich
Tramway in the middle, cars and bicycles on the outside and no place for automobiles to park on the road.

Near the Hotel Krone in Zürich

Old Building near Zürich Hauptbahnhof
Interesting old building with a tower near the train station.

Alpine Swifts over Zürich
The Alpine Swifts were quite active at this building while we were there.

Rock Pigeon

Mandarin Duck
We saw and photographed this Mandarin Duck at a distance.

Common Blackbird
The common blackbird was snacking here. Just three-and-twenty more and we could make a pie.

Chaffinch
Pretty bird with quite a strong song.

Zürich Downtown Street
The narrow streets were interesting and each seemed a little different.

Red-crested Pochard
Male Red-creasted Pochard.

Red-crested Pochard
Female Red-creasted Pochard.

Red-crested Pochard
Returning from a dip this one’s back still had a sheet of water on it.

Red-crested Pochard
A fraction of a second later and the sheet of water had broken up.

Red-crested Pochard
Another instant and the duck’s back appeared dry again.

Narrow stair-walkway between buildings
One of my favourite stair pictures for the day.

Cobblestones, Stairway and Wooden Home
Yet another ramp/stairway climbing a hill.

Cobblestone Path Between Buildings

Singing Chaffinch
This bird was singing merrily away when…

Singing Chaffinch Noticing the Audience
it spotted a small audience forming behind its back.

Common Blackbird Singing

Hiking in the Anza Borrego Desert State Park

The Anza Borrego Desert State Park is the largest state park in California stretching from the Mexican border north some 60 miles or so more north towards Palm Springs.  We went on a day trip and saw only one piece of the entire park hiking a single trail.  Nevertheless, we did get a sense of the park despite our short stay.

We left Palm Springs fairly early. The drive to the park is straight down the 10 interstate until you reach Indio at which point you branch onto the 86 and head south.  When you arrive at the town of Salton City, you take the S22 (also known as the Borrego Salton Sea Way) west.  The road is not in fantastic shape but it gets you to the park:
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Along the way you will see a large area of the land being used by off-road vehicles. There was a fairly visible presence of both off-road ATV type vehicles and camping vehicles from cars with small trailers to monster RVs.
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Eventually the road runs into Borrego Springs which is a small town based around a large oasis in the desert.
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This following was taken from the car as we drove into town:
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Like other desert environments in the US southwest, the Colorado Desert can be characterized by its vegetation.  The Sonoran Desert is known for its giant Saguaro cactuses; the Mohave Desert for its Joshua Trees.  The Colorado Desert, sometimes considered part of the Sonoran Desert, has creosote bushes, the ocotillo – not a cactus but a deciduous desert plant – and many other plant varieties.  The Western Fan Palm, the tree found at oases throughout the region and the only native palm tree in North America, is typically found in a Colorado Desert environment.

The visitor center for the park was be partially buried – presumably to help manage the extreme heat of the summer months:
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A short interpretive walk showcased some of the key aspects of the park and the Colorado Desert. Here is a large ocotillo which is not a true cactus:
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Between the various plants growing in the desert was some pretty cool looking, colourful ground cover.
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We came planning to take one good hike and the one that was recommended was the Palm Canyon Trail with trailhead a short drive away:
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The trail starts in a dry river bed. There was a surprising amount of vegetation and a fair number of plants were flowering.
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As we climbed out of the river bed the trail wound its way through a field of rocks and boulders.
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There is lots of vegetation from many different plants to be seen along the way including this colourful ground cover.
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After a fair hike through the rocks we came around a ridge and got our first view of the oasis.
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The 2004 Flood

In September of 2004 a rainstorm dropped a large amount of rain on the area around the Palm Canyon. The resulting flash flood ripped apart the oasis leaving only a quarter of the trees standing. The remainder were scattered around, several being washed downstream by the fast flowing water. A good account of this event and the effects on the canyon is listed in the references at the bottom of this post.

Here are some of the palm trees that were ripped out of the ground during the flash flood.
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At times, the path to the oasis was somewhat creatively constructed around the large boulders.
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Some of the biggest boulders were found as we approached the oasis. The stream of running water became more obvious as well.
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How much power was their in the flood waters? Check this out:
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Finally – the Oasis:
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The oasis comes with a small waterfall too.
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A pond with water just down from the waterfall is covered with what looks like duckweed. I wonder how that got here?
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We started back down the trail, eventually taking a different fork to follow a different trail back to the parking lot.

In case you didn’t get the scale of the earlier picture with boulder on trunk here is a version with boulder, trunk and me.
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The running water supports lots of different types of vegetation that look like they belong in a wetter climate.
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Event away from the stream, there were many flowering desert plants.
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As mentioned some of the logs were moved a long way down stream. This large palm trunk was found more than half way back to the parking lot.
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And that, as they say, is a wrap – to the hike at least. We didn’t see many birds and I wasn’t able to get much on camera. There was a Shrike and a high-up hawk and a few sparrows.

We stopped in Borrego Springs for lunch and then headed back on highway 78 which runs south of the S22 towards the south end of the Salton Sea. We were off to check out the Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge though I’ll leave the details of that for another post.

References, and Further Reading

The article: Anza-Borrego: Plant Guide To Borrego Palm Canyon Nature Trail has extensive information on the Palm Canyon Trail, its vegetation and the September 2004 flood.

Hummingbirds at the Indian Canyons Trading Post

The city of Palm Springs lies nestled up against the northeast corner of the San Jacinto Mountains, the northernmost of the Peninsular Ranges, a group of mountain ranges that extend along the coast as far as the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula in Mexico.

Driving due South from Palm Springs along Palm Canyon Drive takes you into a pocket in the mountains that includes part of the tribal land for the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians. This area is referred to as the Indian Canyons that is accessible for a number of activities. Numerous trails of varying length and difficulty are available for hiking and for equestrian use. Some good trail maps can be found at this Indian Canyons web site.

At the end of Palm Canyon Drive are several parking lots and The Trading Post that is the starting point for several of the trails. If you want trail advice or just a souvenir, you find it at the Trading Post.  And if, like me, you forget to bring a sun hat, they’ve got that covered as well.

The Hummingbirds

For those who like to watch hummingbirds, they have several feeders which have been quite active the two times that we have been there. During this visit, most of the hummers that we saw were Costa’s though the odd Anna’s was seen as well. This was actually not a problem since, being from the Vancouver area, we see Anna’s Hummingbirds all the time so I was more interested in the Costa’s hummingbirds anyways.  Because of the feeder locations, you can sit at one of the covered picnic tables to watch the hummers come and go.

The following two images show a male Costa’s with its lovely deep purple colouration on throat and head.  Depending on the direction of the light, I have seen the colour go from black to a deep blue.Costa's Hummingbird-1080137

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The hummers appear to be fairly used to the humans so you can approach to within a few feet of the feeders and get a good view without having them fly away. If you have a camera with a reasonable zoom capable of fast shutter speeds, you can get some pretty good pictures too.

One Feeder – Three Costa’s

The following sequence of pictures show 3 Costa’s hummingbirds, 1 male and 2 female, as they go after the nectar in one of the feeders. The sequence starts with 1 male and 1 female both perched with the second female arriving to join in. Both of the feeding hummers initially stopped feeding, I suppose to check out the new arrival.
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In the next 3 images you can see the seated hummer apparently ‘chirping’ at the new arrival when it gets too close. This appears to be successful at keeping the new bird away. The male seems content to let the females sort things out.Costa's Hummingbirds-1080118

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The entire sequence lasted only a few seconds.  The first 5 images (above) were taken over about 1 second using my camera’s burst mode which was set to take 5 pictures per second for a burst of up to 11 images.

Eventually the late arrival moves off and re-appears at an empty spot on the far side of the feeder.  In fact, as this image was taken 6 seconds after the first 5, this could be a fourth hummer coming for a sip.Costa's Hummingbirds-1080122

Costa’s meets Anna’s

The next picture shows both a male Costa’s and a female Anna’s facing each other on opposite sides of the same feeder. You can clearly see the larger size of the Anna’s Hummingbird.  Another difference between the species is visible.  In the Anna’s, when perched, the tail extends noticeably past the wingtips whereas in the Costa’s the wingtips and tail end at roughly the same point.
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An interesting observation that is clear in this image is that when the two hummers are perched face-to-face, it appears that the center of balance of both is outside of the perching ring.  In effect they are leaning backwards using their grip to prevent them from falling off of the perch.  Why wouldn’t they just sit with their centre of balance over the perch?  One reason that I can think of is that this allows for a quick escape by, in effect, ‘falling’ off of the perch.

The staring contest ended with the Anna’s departure.  Note that the Anna’s departure is low, below the feeder consistent with a “quick getaway by falling off the perch“.
Male Costa's and Female Anna's (disappearing) Hummingbirds-1080152

Final Thoughts

The dynamics of hummingbirds competing for spots on a feeder is always entertaining.  These birds move so quickly, however, that capturing the details would be all but impossible without a camera having a high-shutter speed, burst mode and a good optical zoom.  A tripod would be useful though the above pictures were all taken with the camera hand-held.  The built-in image stabilization no double helped create sharp images without a tripod.

The progress of camera technology is impressive.  A few years ago, taking the above images would probably have required thousands of dollars worth of camera equipment.  I took them all using a Panasonic DMC-FZ200 which currently goes for well under $1000.

 

Vancouver to Toronto by Train Day 5: End of the Road

Previous Day 4: Northern Ontario

We started the final day much as we had started the previous 4 days, by rising early and trying to get our bearings.
Early on the Last DayShort Stop at WashagoWe were scheduled to arrive in Toronto on the morning of Tuesday, July 9 around 08:30. The original plan was for me to catch a GO bus back to Barrie to get picked up and taken to Collingwood.  JC would go to the airport and rent a car for a 2 day detour to Kingston (300 km to the east) and eventually end up in Collingwood eventually as well.

We had already decided the day before that I would get off at Washago, saving hours of extra travel time.  Washago sits at the northernmost point of Lake Couchiching, itself at the northernmost end of Lake Simcoe.  The rail crew indicated that a “short stop” would not be a problem.

First we needed to confirm my change of plans that we had texted the night before.  We soon discovered that our plans needed some additional changes as well.

The Toronto Storm

On the evening of Monday, July 8, Toronto had a rainstorm that broke rainfall records with over 120 mm of rain falling.  The storm paralyzed much of the city including the rail system.  As we learned of this early Tuesday morning it quickly became clear that going into Toronto was a bad idea for both of us.  I was glad of my change of plans and now we needed to re-organize JC’s plans as well.

We quickly changed the car rental to a Barrie pickup and an airport drop-off and informed the train staff that both of use wold be detraining together.  Eventually, with the train running 2-1/2 hours late, both JC and I got off the train at Washago.

Washago

Train DisappearingWashago Train StationWashago is part of the Ramara Township municipality that was formed in 1994 from around 50 once-separate communities. The total population of this Township is about 10,000.

Killdeer with Young

Killdeer with YoungKilldeer with YoungWhile waiting for our ride we wandered around the Washago train station and discovered a family of killdeer consisting of an adult and two juveniles.

Our vacation within a vacation was over and the Collingwood part was about to begin.

More Links

All Day 5 Pictures on Flickr

Day 4: Northern Ontario

Vancouver to Toronto by Train Day 4: Northern Ontario

Previous Day 3: Saskatchewan and Manitoba

Sioux Lookout to past Hornepayne

Rivers and Lakes and Trees

We woke around 07:00 some 100 km or so to the east of Sioux Lookout.  This was to be a day of a day of rivers, lakes and trees.
Lakes and ForestsLakes and ForestsTrain Rounding a BendLakes and Forests
We made an early brief stop in a small spot called Savant Lake at the intersection with Highway 599 to drop off some passengers.

Anyone going south on 599 had a 150 km drive to Highway 17, the Trans-Canada.  Anyone going north would be travelling through boreal wilderness with the only eventual options of turning back or continuing on by sea-plane.

The CN line continued eastward, passing north of Lake Nipigon towards the next station of Longlac some 300 km further on.  It was 13:30 when we finally arrived.

Longlac is part of an amalgamated town called Greenstone with a 2011 census population of under 5000 people.  It sits at the north end of Long Lake (one of dozens with the same name in Ontario) which stretches around 80 km towards Lake Superior with a width that is rarely more than 2 km.

The Endless Boreal Shield

When we moved out west from Kingston (Ontario) to Vancouver in 2009, we drove the Trans-Canada Highway that hugs the north shore of Lake Huron and Lake Superior.  On that trip, the entire first 3 days of our trip were spent in Ontario.  Even with multiple drivers travelling around the clock, we would have been hard-pressed to get out of the province in under 24 hours.  Northern Ontario is big, the distances are great and the landscape does not change much.
Lakes and ForestsLumber Truck

The trip in the other direction was similar though it was taking an even more remote route. By the time we reached the end of our trip we would have been on the train at least 30 hours just in Ontario. If you were starting in Madrid, a trip of the same distance in Europe would take you roughly to Vienna with much more variation in scenery.

If you check the geography more closely, you will see that the entire area that we were travelling through was part of the Boreal Shield ecozone with its mixed forests and endless lakes and rivers.  Unlike the previous day there would be much less evidence of development as the Boreal Shield was less amenable to agriculture and human settlement.

From Longlac, the CN tracks run south of the highway reaching the CN rail-town of HornePayne about 150 km further. We arrived around 16:30 and had our first opportunity of the day to leave the train.

Hornepayne

Hornepayne is a small township with a 2011 census population of 1050 people (down over 13% since 2006).  On a map it appears to be in the middle of nowhere.
HornepayneHornepayne

The nearest cities of substantial size are Thunder Bay 300 km to the southwest, Sault Ste. Marie 300 km to the south and Sudbury 400 km to the southeast. Hornepayne is an important stop on the CN line.  It also supports an active timber industry, the region’s primary employer.

I mentioned the trees, rivers and lakes but did I mention the bugs?  Northern Ontario is known for its bugs.  In the spring it is the black flies which have a enough of a reputation that there has even been a Canadian folk song written about them.

Early July was probably near the end of their season but mosquitos were also on the menu (actually, it was probably us on theirs).  We were concerned that our brief time off of the train would have us running from the little biters.  Happily, there was a light breeze and neither critter was a big nuisance during our time off the train.

All Quiet on the Wildlife Front

Unlike the previous day, there was relatively little wildlife activity.
BeaverMerganserEarly in the day we had our one and only moose sighting. It was briefly visible from the neck up as it was swimming away from us in a small lake. We also saw a total of three beavers one of which we managed to get “on film”.

On the bird front, there were several Cedar Waxwings spotted during one of our stops to let a freight-train pass.  Lots of Loons were spotted in ones and twos on lakes that we passed and a lone merganser was seen near where we took our beaver pictures.

Changing Plans

My original plan to detrain in Toronto and then make my way back up to Collingwood changed sometime during the day and the plan that emerged was for me to get off the train at the CN stop in Washago (a small town north of Orillia) and have my ride pick me up there in the morning instead of later in the day in Barrie.  JC’s plans remained unchanged: Get off the train in Toronto, rent a car and head off to Kingston for a couple of days before meeting up back in Collingwood.

There was almost no cell-phone coverage the entire day as we passed through North Ontario.  However, before we hit the sack, we did manage to get a couple of emails and texts off to let the appropriate people know of our changed plans.

So ended Day 4.

The Black Fly Song

Written in 1949 by Wade Hemsworth, this song is something of a Canadian folk music classic.  Here are the chorus lyrics and a YouTube recording of Wade singing the song:

And the black flies, the little black flies
Always the black fly no matter where you go
I’ll die with the black fly a-pickin’ my bones
In North Ontar-eye-o-eye-o, In North Ontar-eye-o

More Links

All Day 4 Pictures on Flickr

Day 3: Saskatchewan and Manitoba
Day 5: End of the Road